Homemade Food

Meal Planning Resource: Workweek Lunch

 

Workweek Lunch, like other meal planning services, sells monthly subscriptions. But for the low price of your email address, you can get ideas for getting organized and choosing food options that fit your budget. And it’s all about lunch. Excellent!

Are you more of an assembler than a cook? There are lists of  Minimal Cooking  and  Beginner  recipes, too.

Are you more of an assembler than a cook? There are lists of Minimal Cooking and Beginner recipes, too.

If you’re new-ish to Box Lunch Lifestyle you might be wondering, “But isn’t this kinda the same thing?”

No.

The food part of lunch is important, but it’s not everything. Box Lunch Lifestyle asks if you’re living the life you’ve always promised yourself. If you aren’t, and you’ve put your own dreams on hold for too long, lunch is an opportunity to finally make good on those promises to yourself—to eat a little better, but also to spend a piece of (almost) every day investing in yourself.

It’s making these two most-basic choices “better” together and regularly, in a no-pressure kind of way, that makes Box Lunch Lifestyle work. Your body gets stronger, because you’re feeding your spirit. Your spirit gets stronger, because you’re feeding your body. Not a fad. Not complicated. And not just food.

Box Lunch Lifestyle is the foundation of a holistic lifestyle practice that will motivate and sustain you in a way that “just food” simply can’t. That makes it a different kind of animal. Just like you.


 

A new, easy dish: Egg Muffin Cups

 

I’ve been making this recipe from Nutritional Weight and Wellness for a long time—but as muffins instead of a casserole. With vegetables on the side, two of these fill me up!

This is a recipe you can totally make your own. Here’s how I make this “better” food for me:

  • replace the cream/coconut milk with a spoonful of sour cream

  • replace with hash browns with 24 of these potato puffs (thawed)

  • replace the spinach with fried onions and mushrooms

  • wait on any shredded cheese (I’m usually making them ahead, so I add cheese, sometimes, when reheating)

Lots of vegetables can be added, or other meats like good bacon or ham. Or no meat at all. It’s hard to get this wrong. If I can make it work, you can.

BUT here’s one VERY IMPORTANT tip to give this dish a chance at becoming part of your make-your-own routine: I’ve found that only 5x5” parchment paper squares keep these muffins from sticking like the dickens. Less time scrubbing, more time doing anything else.

 

Meal Planning Resource: Real Plans

 

Need a little Meal Planning 101? Check out Real Plans. They sell meal plan subscriptions that you can try for a couple of weeks for free. What’s awesome, though, is that they’re generous with how-to information to get you started. (Isn’t it nice when people share?)

And look at this! They like lunch as much as we do.

I have no business affiliation with Real Plans. I just think they have a Box Lunch Lifestyle kind of common sense. See what you think.

I have no business affiliation with Real Plans. I just think they have a Box Lunch Lifestyle kind of common sense. See what you think.

 

Better Food: "What am I going to eat?"

Do you worry a lot about this question? Here’s one super-easy path to answer it—confidently—in less than 60 seconds:

  1. Write down two vegetables you enjoy eating. Just two.

    Examples: cucumbers, potatoes, cherry tomatoes, bell peppers, iceberg lettuce (I like iceberg, too, and I won’t tell anyone that you didn’t choose kale.)

  2. Write down one other food item you enjoy eating. Think “food” (e.g., cheese) instead of “dish” (e.g., fettuccine Alfredo).
    Examples: ham, yogurt, almonds, PB & J, leftover chicken, mushrooms, or another vegetable

Lunch food can be as simple as three items (e.g., tomatoes and bell pepper slices with slices of ham). They don’t have to “match” or become an elaborate, Instagram-worthy lunch masterpiece. You can eat as much of these three things as you need to feel satisfied.

Your Box Lunch Lifestyle food is better simply because you like it and it’s so basic that you can do it yourself. No calorie counting or worrying, just doing. What you choose is better than any “unknown” food—meaning “don’t know what I’ll eat” AND “don’t know who made it.”

You DO have time to cook.

I know you’re busy. I’m busy, too.

But what is the cost of NOT preparing your food at least for one meal on most days? Michael Pollan—a big-time advocate of home cooking—suggests that if we have time to be online for pleasure for as much as a couple hours per day, couldn’t replace some of that time with “better” food?

I’d love to hear what you think. What I think is that a little simple cooking for yourself isn’t as bad as you think.